This program supports nurses and nursing students as they progress through their career journey.

The Collaborative Mentorship Program

Mentoring is widely recognized as an extremely beneficial career development tool. Studies have shown that those who are mentored 1) perform better on the job; 2) advance more rapidly within the organization; 3) express lower turnover intentions than their non-mentored counterparts; and 4) report more job and career satisfaction (Poe, 2006).


It is the mission of NBNA “to represent and provide a forum for Black Nurses to advocate and implement strategies to ensure access to the highest quality of healthcare for persons of color." In doing so, The National Black Nurses Association has launched its latest initiative the Collaborative Mentorship Program on Monday, May 9, 2016.


The NBNA Collaborative Mentorship Program serves the purpose of helping NBNA nurses/student nurses at various levels of their development. There are several levels of development in the nursing profession and every nurse can benefit from mentorship. In this program the three levels of mentoring are:


Approaching Careers Description  (Beginners or Fundamental) - This level of mentorship is to support the growth and development of nurses and potential nurses as they approach career opportunities (e.g., student nurses, novice nurses, members of organizations, undergraduate degrees, etc.). The purpose is to foster the development of a nursing community and enhance the preceptor skills of nurses as they engage in the mentorship process.


Acknowledging Professions Description (Intermediate) -This level of mentorship is to support the growth and development of nurses as they transition into new roles (e.g., any office in an organization, management, local Board positions, graduate level degrees, etc.). The purpose is to foster the development of a nursing community and enhance the preceptor skills of nurses as they engage in the mentorship process. 


Aspiring Leaders Description (advanced) - This level of mentorship is to support the growth and development of nurses as they transition into executive leadership roles (e.g., president of organizations, CNO’s, National Board positions, FAANs, specialty or doctoral degrees, etc.). The purpose is to foster the development of a nursing community and enhance the preceptor skills of nurses as they engage in the mentorship process.

The National Black Nurses Association

The NBNACMP is sponsored by The National Black Nurses Association (NBNA).


NBNA represents 150,000 African American registered nurses, licensed vocational/practical nurses, nursing students and retired nurses from the USA, Eastern Caribbean and Africa, with 95+ chartered chapters, in 35+ states.


The National Black Nurses Association’s mission is “to represent and provide a forum for Black nurses to advocate and implement strategies to ensure access to the highest quality of healthcare for persons of color”.


Working in partnership with community based organizations, corporations and other organizations, NBNA has sponsored health fairs and health education and outreach for national organizations such as the National Urban League, International Black Professional Firefighters, One Hundred Black Men of America and the National Council of Negro Women. NBNA has collaborated with the Black Congress on Health, Law and Economics, a 17 member, multi-professional organization; Oncology Nursing Society, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association, American Association of Nurses in AIDS Care; National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics; Partnership to Fight Chronic Diseases; and, National African American Drug Policy Coalition; Black Women’s Health Imperative; and, the International Society for Hypertension in Blacks, among others.


In 1998, the National Black Nurses Association became one of the five founding organizations of the National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurse Associations, along with Asian American/Pacific Islander Nurses Association, Inc., National Alaska Native American Indian Nurses Association, Inc.; National Association of Hispanic Nurses, Inc.; and, the Philippine Nurses Association of America, Inc. This collaboration gives voice to 350,000 minority nurses. Dr. Betty Smith Williams was the first NCEMNA president and a past NBNA president.


Its goals include support for the development of a cadre of ethnic nurses reflecting the nation's diversity; advocacy for culturally competent, accessible and affordable health care; promotion of the professional and educational advancement of ethnic nurses; education of consumers, health care professionals and policy makers on health issues of ethnic minority populations; development of ethnic minority nurse leaders in areas of health policy, practice, education and research; endorsement of best practice models of nursing practice, education, and research for minority populations.


Collaborative Mentorship Brochure